Monthly Archives: June 2013

Need help from Copley Library during summer session?

If you are lucky enough to spend Summer Session at the University of San Diego, Copley Library is here to support you!  Services that we provide during the regular academic year are available to you as a Summer Session student.  Some of these services include:

San Diego Circuit – find books at Copley Library or borrow from a consortium of local libraries through Copley.  If you can’t find your book in Copley Library’s online catalog, try the same search in the Circuit Database.

Interlibrary Loan – if your research requires material that is not available in Copley Library or through the Circuit, you can request book titles, journal articles, theses and dissertations here.

Express Books – request items through the online catalog to be placed on hold at the Access Services desk. Click on the Request It icon in the catalog. Library staff will retrieve the requested items, place them on hold at the Access Services desk, and an email will be sent to you.  Items should be available for pick-up within three days.   Look for this icon in your search results:

Request it

And don’t forget that the Access Services desk has Mac and PC laptops as well as laptop and mobile device chargers for checkout!

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Religious of the Sacred Heart Postcard Collection

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Copley Library’s Special Collections & Archive is working to digitize a cache of postcards from Europe, with large collections from Germany, Italy and France.  Many of the postcards were mailed from Europe to a Miss May Clarke of St. Joseph, Missouri.   Miss Clarke and her sister, Genevieve, traveled extensively throughout Europe, attending Sacred Heart Schools.  May received a degree from the University of Munich, and Genevieve became the founding librarian of the San Diego College for Women.  Copley Library is blessed to be the keepers of their wonderful postcard collection.

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The curious thing about many of the earliest postcards, is the fact that the hand-written notes were on the image side of the postcards.  Why would someone write all over a picture of beautiful Belle Époque Paris?  Simply put, it was illegal to write anywhere else.

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It wasn’t until March 1, 1907 that the US Post Office allowed the back of postcards to be divided into two areas.  One area was designated for the message, and the other for the address and postage.  Prior to that, no writing other than the recipient’s address was allowed on the back of a postcard.  This allowed for the beautiful pictures of destinations near and far to fill the front of the postcard and not be blemished by the squashed scrawl of handwriting.

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